Connection Between Oral Health and Overall Health

connection between oral health and overall health - Easton PA

Connection Between Oral Health and Overall Health

Did you know there’s a correlation between your oral health and your overall wellness? Poor dental health has been related to heart disease, diabetes, pregnancy problems, and other health issues, according to research. The good news is that you can prevent these oral health problems. Below, Dr. Dave Moghadam discusses the connection between oral health and overall health. 

Making the Connection Between Oral Health and Overall Health

Your mouth is a window into your body’s health. Insight into your general health can sometimes be observed in your mouth. Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is common in patients who have chronic conditions such as heart disease or diabetes. 

What You Should Understand About Gum Disease

Gum disease is caused by an infection and inflammation of the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Bacteria in plaque, a sticky coating that is always on your teeth, create the infection. As a result of the infection, your gums become inflamed – red, puffy, and swollen.

Gum disease, if left untreated, can seriously damage your gum tissues and bone. Eventually, gum disease will lead to tooth loss. 

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is a condition that occurs when your body reacts to an infection by inflaming your gums. In fact, it is the first stage of gum disease. Those who have gingivitis can take the right steps to reverse it. Without treatment, gingivitis can develop into the more serious type of gum disease – advanced periodontitis. If gum disease is detected early enough, you may only require professional cleaning or periodontal therapy. Your dentist in Easton, PA, will provide you with tips on how to improve your regular oral hygiene.

Periodontitis

Gingivitis can progress into periodontitis if not treated. Additionally, periodontitis is normally painless, although it can cause bone loss. Some symptoms of periodontitis are:

  • Gums that bleed when brushing or flossing gums, that are red, swollen, puffy, or sensitive gums that no longer securely grip your teeth foul breath that doesn’t go away
  • Pus, loosing feeling in your teeth
  • You may detect one or more of these warning signs, or you may not notice any gum disease symptoms at all. This is why it is critical to visit your dentist on a regular basis.
  • Our friend Dr. Ryan Helgerson, a dentist in Grand Junction, CO, points out that gum disease treatment is most effective when it is detected early.

The Relationship Between the Mouth and the Body

Certain chronic conditions have been linked to an increased risk of gum disease. Furthermore, gum disease has been found to increase the risk and severity of chronic diseases. While it is unclear if one causes the other, the following chronic conditions are frequently associated with gum disease:

  • Arthritis
  • Diabetes
  • Emphysema
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Blood pressure is too high
  • Hepatitis C 
  • Obesity
  • Stroke

Tobacco Use Increases Chances of Gum Disease 

These days, tobacco products are more popular. Additionally, tobacco use in whatever form (cigarettes, dip/chew, e-cigs, hookah, etc.) is a known risk factor for a variety of chronic disorders, including gum disease. Tobacco use raises the likelihood of developing gum disease. The condition can also worsen if you smoke cigarettes for a longer period of time.

Many drugs used to treat various disorders can have an adverse effect on your mouth by producing dry mouth. Among these are drugs used to treat high blood pressure, allergies, and pain. A dry mouth might raise your chances of developing tooth decay and gum disease.

So, now that you have a better understanding of the connection between oral health and overall health, we can all make strides to better oral health. For dental care in Easton, PA, contact College Hill Dental Group.