Stages of Gum Disease

stages of gum disease - gum disease awareness month

Stages of Gum Disease

February is also Gum Disease Awareness Month! To celebrate, our Easton PA dentists are exploring the different stages of gum disease. If you believe you’re at any of these stages of gum disease, please contact our dental office immediately.

Gum Disease

There are three stages of gum disease. They range from moderate to extreme depending on the severity of the tooth infection. These three stages are considered to be gingivitis, periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. Read the following to learn more about gum disease and how it affects your oral health. 

Gingivitis 

You’ve probably heard of gingivitis, the first stage of gum disease. Most people experience gingivitis at one point in their lives. This stage of gum disease is a mild tooth infection. In contrast to the more serious stages of gum disease, gingivitis is the least damaging since it does not affect the bone. Dr. Moghadam says that immediate professional care can, in fact, reverse the infection, bringing you to a fast recovery. 

Many people don’t know they have gingivitis because the symptoms are subtle. The symptoms of gingivitis include sensitive, swollen, red, and bleeding gums. Other implications that you might have for gingivitis include the occasional bad breath, plaque buildup, and apparent gaps between gums and teeth. Dr. Ben Kacos, an endodontist in Shreveport, LA, points out that these holes are created as a result of disruption to the periodontal fibers known to connect the gums to the teeth.

Moderate Periodontitis 

Moderate periodontitis is the second stage of gum disease. This stage happens when gingivitis progresses due to a lack of treatment. Similar to gingivitis, your gums and teeth will be tender, red, sore, and bleeding. Dentists in Easton, PA, agree that bad breath is usually permanent at this stage.

For periodontitis, the condition is more advanced, which means the bone loss is now likely. This happens as a result of the development of periodontal pockets, which remove the teeth and establish a hub for infection. The infected gums cause the teeth to become brittle and loosen. However, there is still time to reverse the harm caused by moderate periodontitis. If you are at this stage of gum disease, please visit College Hill Dental Group for periodontal treatment in Easton, PA. 

Advanced Periodontitis 

Advanced periodontitis is the last and third-degree of gum disease. It is perhaps the most serious stage, causing tooth decay and tooth loss. Once you’ve reached this stage of gum disease, there is no going back. Unfortunately, advanced periodontitis is permanent. Signs of advanced periodontitis include swelling around the root of the tooth, a defective bite, and pus from the gums.

The magnitude of this stage means that periodontal pockets have now increased in size, deepening and providing more space for bacteria to flourish. As a result, this infection causes considerable damage to the bone and causes loss of teeth and decay. Your dentists may need to extract your teeth and restore them with dental implants or dentures. 

Visit College Hill Dental Group

If you’re at any stage of gum disease, please contact College Hill Dental Group immediately. Our team of experienced professionals will do everything possible to save your teeth and restore your smile to its original glory. We offer different dental savings plans to make our services affordable. If you have any questions at all, please give us a call. We look forward to seeing you soon!

February is also Gum Disease Awareness Month! To celebrate, our Easton PA dentists are exploring the different stages of gum disease. If you believe you’re at any of these stages of gum disease, please contact our dental office immediately.

Gum Disease

There are three stages of gum disease. They range from moderate to extreme depending on the severity of the tooth infection. These three stages are considered to be gingivitis, periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. Read the following to learn more about gum disease and how it affects your oral health. 

Gingivitis 

You’ve probably heard of gingivitis, the first stage of gum disease. Most people experience gingivitis at one point in their lives. This stage of gum disease is a mild tooth infection. In contrast to the more serious stages of gum disease, gingivitis is the least damaging since it does not affect the bone. Dr. Moghadam says that immediate professional care can, in fact, reverse the infection, bringing you to a fast recovery. 

Many people don’t know they have gingivitis because the symptoms are subtle. The symptoms of gingivitis include sensitive, swollen, red, and bleeding gums. Other implications that you might have for gingivitis include the occasional bad breath, plaque buildup, and apparent gaps between gums and teeth. Dr. Ben Kacos, an endodontist in Shreveport, LA, points out that these holes are created as a result of disruption to the periodontal fibers known to connect the gums to the teeth.

Moderate Periodontitis 

Moderate periodontitis is the second stage of gum disease. This stage happens when gingivitis progresses due to a lack of treatment. Similar to gingivitis, your gums and teeth will be tender, red, sore, and bleeding. Dentists in Easton, PA, agree that bad breath is usually permanent at this stage.

For periodontitis, the condition is more advanced, which means the bone loss is now likely. This happens as a result of the development of periodontal pockets, which remove the teeth and establish a hub for infection. The infected gums cause the teeth to become brittle and loosen. However, there is still time to reverse the harm caused by moderate periodontitis. If you are at this stage of gum disease, please visit College Hill Dental Group for periodontal treatment in Easton, PA. 

Advanced Periodontitis 

Advanced periodontitis is the last and third-degree of gum disease. It is perhaps the most serious stage, causing tooth decay and tooth loss. Once you’ve reached this stage of gum disease, there is no going back. Unfortunately, advanced periodontitis is permanent. Signs of advanced periodontitis include swelling around the root of the tooth, a defective bite, and pus from the gums.

So, the magnitude of this stage means that periodontal pockets have now increased in size, deepening and providing more space for bacteria to flourish. As a result, this infection causes considerable damage to the bone and causes loss of teeth and decay. Furthermore, your dentists may need to extract your teeth and restore them with dental implants or dentures. 

Visit College Hill Dental Group

If you’re at any stage of gum disease, please contact College Hill Dental Group immediately. Our team of experienced professionals will do everything possible to save your teeth and restore your smile to its original glory. We offer different dental savings plans to make our services affordable. If you have any questions at all, please give us a call. We look forward to seeing you soon!

How to Treat a Toothache

how to treat a toothache - emergency dentist near me

How to Treat a Toothache

February 9th, 2021, is National Toothache Day! Most of us have experienced a toothache at one point in our lives. If you have, you know how painful toothaches can be and that they don’t just go away on their own. In the following article, emergency dentists in Easton, PA, share different ways on how to treat a toothache.

What to Do If You Get a Toothache 

Any toothaches that come from pressure outside (but not inside) your tooth will get easier without going to the dentist. Pressure caused by redness in the gums will be healed within just a few days. Try not to chew about the infected area at this period. Eat soft foods, avoid hot or cold foods while your teeth are still sensitive.

How to Relieve Your Toothache at Home

Below are a few ways Dr. Moghahdam suggests temporarily relieving your toothache:

  • Rinsing with warm salt water is an old trick. Saltwater can release debris between your teeth, act as a disinfectant, and reduce inflammation. Stir a 1⁄2 teaspoon of salt in a bottle of warm water and clean your mouth thoroughly.
  • Rinse in peroxide and hydrogen. Hydrogen peroxide (3 percent solution) helps minimize inflammation and discomfort. Dilute the hydrogen peroxide with equivalent sections of the water and rinse thoroughly. Don’t swallow it.
  • Use a cold compress. Keep a cool compress of ice covered in a towel to the sore region for 20 minutes for swelling and discomfort. Repeat a couple of hours.
  • Use Anti-Inflammatory Medication. Over-the-counter pain medications can relieve pain and inflammation. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®). Do not give an infant under 16 years of age aspirin; instead, use Tylenol.
  • Try clove oil, say our friends at Park Boulevard Family Dentistry, a dental office in Pinellas, FL. A natural antiseptic that induces discomfort and decreases inflammation. Put a small amount of clove oil on a cotton ball and add to a sore area. Or apply a drop of clove oil to a bottle of water and clean your mouth thoroughly.
  • Extract of vanilla. Vanilla extract alcohol causes discomfort temporarily, and the antioxidants allow the area to recover. Using your fingers or cotton ball, and add the extract to your teeth and gum a few times a day.
  • Tee with peppermint. The relaxing effects of peppermint can be added to a sore region with a refrigerated peppermint tea bag. Keep this wet tea bag between your teeth and your gum.
  • It’s garlic. Prepare a paste of crushed garlic clove and add to the infected area. Garlic can destroy bacteria (containing antimicrobial allicin) and relieve pain.

Visiting Your Easton PA Dentist for a Toothache

Temporary, home-made pain relief will not be enough if the toothache continues. Contact our dental office in Easton, PA, if your toothache gets worse. 

Our dental staff will happily see you for an emergency dental visit. We will likely ask you the following questions:

  • Where’s the pain located?
  • When did it begin?
  • How bad is that?
  • What makes the suffering unbearable, and what gives you relief?

During your full mouth evaluation, we will check your lips, eyes, gums, jaws, tongue, lungs, sinuses, head, nose, and neck. We will also take dental X-rays to your teeth to better demonstrate the source of your toothache.

How Will the Dentist Treat My Toothache? 

Your treatment for your toothache will depend on the dental problem. After further assessment of your mouth, we will create a custom treatment plan and go over it with you:

  •  If you have a hole in your tooth, we will patch the cavity, perform a root canal, or, if necessary, extract your tooth. 
  • A root canal may be required if the source of the toothache is an inflammation of the nerve of the tooth. Bacteria, which have worked their way into the inner space of the root of the tooth, induce inflammation. This is the best solution if you have severe decay but are still able to save your tooth.
  • An antibiotic may be recommended if there is fever or swelling in the jaw. 

No matter what the cause of your toothache is, we’re more than happy to help treat it. Our modern dental office is well equipped to handle just about any dental emergency. Contact College Hill Dental Group today if you’re experiencing a dental emergency or would just like to schedule an appointment. 

How to Prevent Gum Disease

how to prevent gum disease - College Hill Dental Group

How to Prevent Gum Disease

Periodontal or gum disease refers to an infection of the tissues which hold your teeth in place. In most cases, gum disease results from poor oral hygiene (not brushing or flossing regularly). Over time, built-up plaque hardens into calculus on and around your teeth and gums. When periodontal disease advances, it can result in sore, bleeding gums, and pain while you chew. If the progression of the disease isn’t treated by your dentist in Easton, PA, tooth loss can eventually occur.

Causes of Gum Disease

You probably already know that your mouth is full of bacteria. This bacteria, in combination with other materials, such as food particles and mucus, constantly form a sticky substance called plaque. Plaque is colorless, and when left long enough, it hardens into tartar.

No amount of brushing or flossing can help remover tartar. You’ll need to see a professional in order to remove it. When visiting College Hill Dental Group for a dental cleaning, your dental hygienist will scrape away all the plaque and tartar that is built up. 

Dr. Cody Boals, a Colorado Springs dentist, adds that there are several risk factors that can play a part in developing gum disease. These include genetics, smoking, diabetes, hormonal changes in females, medications that cause dry mouth, and some illnesses, such as AIDS and their medications.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Periodontal (gum) disease triggers a number of symptoms, including the following:

  • Persistent bad breath
  • Swollen or red gums
  • Bleeding or tender gums
  • Pain when you chew
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Teeth appear longer due to gum recession

Diagnosis of Gum Disease

When you visit College Hill Dental Group, your hygienist or dentist in Easton, PA, will:

  • Check your gums for any signs of inflammation
  • Use a probe (a tiny ruler) to measure the gingival pockets (the gaps between your teeth and gums). In a healthy person, the gingival pockets are usually no wider than 3mm, so any pockets that exceed this size will be regarded as indicators of possible gum disease.
  • Inquire about your medical history. The intention here is to establish whether there are any risk factors or conditions that could pave the way for periodontal disease to develop.
  • Take x-rays to find out whether any bone loss has occurred.
  • Recommend periodontal therapy. These are specialists who diagnose and treat periodontal disease. The periodontist often has treatment methods that may not be available at your general dentist’s.

Treatment Options for Gum Disease

When gum disease is caught early, your dentist in Easton, PA, may recommend only a professional cleaning and give you instructions on how to manage the condition at home. However, when the disease progresses, some of the following options may become necessary when you visit College Hill Dental Group:

  • Root planing and scaling. This is a more invasive form of dental cleaning because it involves cleaning beneath your gum line. Don’t worry about the pain of this procedure; it will be performed under a local anesthetic.
  • Gum surgery may also be needed to repair the damage that has been caused by gum disease. For example, your Easton, PA dentist may recommend a gingivectomy. This is a surgical procedure during which infected gum tissue is removed. Flap surgery is another option when cleaning below the gum line is necessary. 
  • Regenerative procedures. You may also need to undergo oral surgery at College Hill Dental Group if one of our dentists finds that you have lost a lot of bone or soft tissues to gum disease. Bone grafting or a gum graft may be the specific procedure that you undergo to trigger the regeneration of bone or soft tissues.

How to Prevent Gum Disease

It is always better to prevent gum disease instead of waiting to have it treated by your dentist in Easton. The following preventive measures can help in this regard:

  • Brush your teeth two times every day using a fluoride toothpaste
  • Floss daily using flossing string, a water flosser, or any other device recommended by your dentist
  • Visit College Hill Dental Group regularly to have your teeth cleaned by a professional as well as to undergo dental checkups.
  • Stop smoking

Gum disease can affect anyone at any time. It is best to combine at-home preventive care with regular professional care provided by your Easton, PA dentist. If you suspect that you have gum disease, contact us immediately, and we will do everything possible to treat the condition before it progresses.