Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation

Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation

Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation

Revitalize Your Smile: A Comprehensive Guide to Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation for Lasting Oral Health and Confidence

A confident smile is a powerful asset, contributing significantly to your overall well-being. For a smile makeover and improved oral health, turn to College Hill Dental Group in Easton, PA, the beacon of excellence. Renowned as the best dentist in Easton, this reputable dental practice specializes in transformative full mouth dental rehabilitation. 

Benefits of Dental Implants

Understanding Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation

Full mouth dental rehabilitation, also known as reconstruction or restoration, comprehensively addresses multiple issues throughout the entire mouth. The designed personalized treatment plan restores functionality, enhances aesthetics, and promotes long-term oral health. Individuals with extensive dental concerns, such as missing teeth, damaged enamel, bite problems, or jaw issues, can benefit significantly from full mouth rehabilitation.

The Benefits of Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation

  1. Comprehensive Solutions: Full mouth rehabilitation offers comprehensive solutions for a wide range of dental issues. From restoring missing teeth to addressing gum disease and correcting misalignments, this holistic approach ensures that all aspects of your oral health are considered and treated.
  2. Improved Oral Functionality: By addressing multiple dental issues simultaneously, full mouth rehabilitation enhances oral functionality. This includes improved chewing ability, better speech, and a more comfortable bite alignment.
  3. Aesthetic Transformation: One of the significant benefits of full mouth rehabilitation is the aesthetic transformation it brings. It addresses stained, misshapen, or damaged teeth, creating a confident, natural-looking smile.
  4. Long-Term Oral Health: Full mouth rehabilitation ensures long-term oral health beyond immediate cosmetic improvements. By addressing underlying dental issues, the treatment helps prevent further damage and decay, contributing to lasting oral well-being.

The Process of Full Mouth Dental Rehabilitation

  1. Comprehensive Assessment: The journey begins with a thorough examination of your oral health. College Hill Dental Group’s experienced dentists will assess the condition of your teeth, gums, jaw, and overall oral structures to identify specific issues and create a tailored treatment plan.
  2. Customized Treatment Plan: The dental team creates a personalized treatment plan based on the assessment to address your unique dental concerns. This may involve a combination of restorative procedures, cosmetic dentistry, orthodontics, and other specialized treatments.
  3. Step-by-Step Implementation: The dental team implements the treatment plan in stages, addressing various aspects of your oral health. This step-by-step approach allows for precision and ensures that each procedure contributes to the overall success of the rehabilitation.

Why Choose College Hill Dental Group for Full Mouth Rehabilitation in Easton

  • Expertise in Full Mouth Rehabilitation: College Hill Dental Group excels in full mouth dental rehabilitation with a proven track record of success. Their skilled team of dentists is adept at creating comprehensive treatment plans, ensuring the best care for you.
  • State-of-the-Art Facilities: The Easton, PA facility of College Hill Dental Group is equipped with state-of-the-art technology, creating an advanced and comfortable environment for your full mouth rehabilitation journey.
  • Personalized and Compassionate Care: Dedicated to your rehabilitation, College Hill Dental Group works closely with you to achieve your smile goals, understanding the significance of your oral health by providing personalized and compassionate care.They  understand the significance of your oral health and work closely with you to achieve your smile goals.
  • Reputation as the Best Dentist in Easton, PA: Recognized as Easton’s best dentist, College Hill Dental Group has a stellar reputation for dental care excellence. Their commitment to patient satisfaction makes them the trusted choice for full mouth rehabilitation in Easton.

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Revitalizing your smile through full mouth dental rehabilitation positively impacts both oral health and confidence.

With College Hill Dental Group, trust you’re in the hands of Easton’s best dentist. College Hill Dental Group’s comprehensive approach, personalized care, and commitment to excellence make it the go-to for full mouth rehabilitation in Easton, PA. Take the first step towards lasting oral health and confidence by scheduling a consultation with College Hill Dental Group today. Your radiant smile awaits its transformation.

Gum Disease and Heart Health

Gum Disease and Heart Health

The Connection Between Gum Disease and Heart Health

Did you know that the health of your gums can have a significant impact on your heart health? It’s true – research has shown that individuals with gum disease are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those with healthy gums. As a dental practice committed to our patients’ overall health and well-being, we at College Hill Dental Group think it’s important to discuss the connection between gum disease and heart health. 

The Connection Between Gum Disease and Heart Health

Understanding the Connection

Research suggests that gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, increases inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries and blood vessels. This inflammation can lead to the buildup of plaque, narrow the arteries, and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Additionally, the harmful bacteria that cause gum disease can travel through the bloodstream and infect the heart and other organs.

Signs and Symptoms

Gum disease typically begins with mild gingivitis, characterized by red, swollen, and bleeding gums. If left untreated, it can progress to more severe periodontitis, causing receding gums, loose teeth, and even tooth loss. It’s crucial to recognize the signs of gum disease, such as bad breath, gum recession, and tooth sensitivity, and visit your dentist at College Hill Dental Group regularly for early detection and treatment.

Prevention and Treatment

The good news is that gum disease is preventable and treatable. Maintaining good oral hygiene habits, including brushing twice daily, flossing daily, avoiding tobacco products, and visiting our dentist every six months, can help prevent gum disease. However, if you already have gum disease, your dentist at College Hill Dental Group may recommend scaling and root planing, a deep cleaning procedure that removes tartar and bacteria from below the gum line. 

Maintaining Overall Wellness

It is essential to take preventative measures, such as regular exercise, a healthy diet, stress management techniques, and avoiding smoking and excess alcohol consumption, to reduce your risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Our Commitment to You

At College Hill Dental Group, we understand the critical link between gum disease and heart health and are committed to providing our patients with comprehensive dental care that prioritizes both oral and overall wellness. Our team of experienced dental professionals uses the latest technology and techniques to prevent, treat, and manage gum disease and promote optimal heart health. We encourage you to schedule your next dental check-up with us and discuss any concerns or questions you may have about your oral and general health.

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Gum disease is more than just a dental issue – it can have serious implications for your heart health and overall well-being. By understanding the connection between gum disease and cardiovascular disease and taking preventative measures to maintain optimal oral and general health, you can reduce your risk of developing serious health conditions. At College Hill Dental Group, we are committed to your health and look forward to partnering with you on your journey to optimal health and wellness.

Dental Implant Care

How to Transform Your Smile With Cosmetic Dentistry

Dental Implant Care

How to Care for Your Dental Implants the Right Way

Dental implants are a great solution for those who have lost a tooth or teeth due to an accident, injury, or any other reason. These implants are artificial roots made of titanium, which are surgically implanted into the jawbone and act as a foundation for artificial teeth. Unlike traditional dentures, dental implants offer a permanent and comfortable replacement for missing teeth, making them an increasingly popular option for many patients. If you are a patient at College Hill Dental Group and have recently received dental implants, it is important to care for them properly to ensure their longevity and prevent infections. 

How to Transform Your Smile With Cosmetic Dentistry

Brushing and Flossing

Just like natural teeth, dental implants require regular brushing and flossing to prevent plaque buildup and bacterial infections. It is recommended to brush your implants twice a day with a soft-bristled brush and fluoride toothpaste. Be careful not to use hard-bristled or abrasive toothbrushes that can damage the implant or cause scratches on the denture. Flossing is also a crucial part of implant care as it helps remove food particles and plaque that can lead to gum disease or even implant failure. If you find it difficult to floss around the implant, you can use interdental brushes or water flossers to clean between the teeth.

Avoid Certain Foods and Drinks

While dental implants are strong and durable, they still require special care to avoid damage or contamination. You should avoid hard and sticky foods that can dislodge or break the implant, such as hard candy, popcorn, and caramel. You should also limit your intake of sugary and acidic foods and drinks that can cause tooth decay, such as soda, coffee, and citrus fruits. Drinking plenty of water can help maintain a healthy pH balance in your mouth and prevent dry mouth, which can lead to bad breath and other dental problems.

Regular Check-ups

Even if your dental implants feel comfortable and look great, it is still important to schedule regular check-ups with your dentist at College Hill Dental Group. Routine exams and cleanings can help detect any potential issues early on and prevent them from becoming serious problems down the line. Your dentist at College Hill Dental Group can also ensure that your implant is properly aligned and that the surrounding gums and bones are healthy.

Quit Smoking

If you are a smoker, it’s crucial to quit smoking to avoid implant failure and other health complications. Smoking can delay the healing process after implant surgery and increase the risk of infection and gum disease. It can also decrease bone density, which can lead to implant loosening or failure. Talk to your dentist at College Hill Dental Group to find resources and support to quit smoking.

Use a Nightguard

If you grind your teeth at night, it’s important to use a nightguard to protect your dental implants from damage. Grinding can put a lot of pressure on the implant and cause it to become dislodged or even fracture. A nightguard can also protect your natural teeth and prevent jaw pain and headaches.

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Dental implants are a great investment in your oral health and appearance. By following these tips and tricks, you can keep your dental implants healthy and strong for many years to come. Remember to brush and floss regularly, avoid certain foods and drinks, schedule regular check-ups, quit smoking, and use a nightguard if necessary. If you have any concerns or questions about your dental implant care, don’t hesitate to reach out to your dental provider for guidance and support. At College Hill Dental Group, we are committed to helping our patients achieve optimal oral health and beautiful smiles through personalized care and education.

The Effects of Aging on Gum Health

The Effects of Aging on Gum Health

The Effects of Aging on Gum Health

The Effects of Aging on Gum Health

Aging is a natural process that we all go through, and it comes with various changes in our bodies and health. One area that tends to get overlooked when it comes to aging is oral health, specifically gum health. Gum health is an essential aspect of our overall oral health, and as we age, our gums become more vulnerable to infections and diseases.

The Effects of Aging on Gum Health

Gum Recession

One of the most noticeable effects of aging on gum health is gum recession. As we age, our gums tend to recede, exposing the root of the teeth. Gum recession can lead to tooth sensitivity and increase the risk of tooth decay and gum disease. It is essential to maintain a good oral hygiene routine and visit your dentist at College Hill Dental regularly to detect any signs of gum recession early.

Gum Disease

Gum disease is a prevalent condition that can affect people of all ages, but it becomes more prevalent as we age. Gum disease is caused by bacteria that accumulate in the mouth, leading to inflammation and damage to the gums.

Medications

As we age, we tend to take more medications to manage various health conditions, and some of these medications can impact our gum health. Some medications cause dry mouth, which reduces saliva production and increases the risk of gum disease. A dry mouth can also lead to bad breath and difficulty chewing and swallowing food.
 

Nutritional Deficiencies

Nutritional deficiencies can also impact gum health. As we age, our bodies require more nutrients to function well, and when we don’t get enough of these nutrients, our gum health can suffer. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats can help keep your gums healthy and reduce the risk of gum disease.

Regular Dental Visits

Regular dental visits are critical to maintaining good gum health as you age. Your dentist at College Hill Dental can detect any signs of gum disease early and provide appropriate treatment before the condition progresses. We can also provide guidance on how to maintain good oral hygiene at home, which is essential in preventing gum disease.

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Maintaining good gum health as you age is essential to your overall oral health and well-being. Gum recession, gum disease, medications, nutritional deficiencies, and regular dental visits are all critical factors that can impact your gum health. By paying attention to your gum health and taking the necessary steps, such as maintaining a good oral hygiene routine, eating a healthy diet, and visiting your dentist regularly, you can keep your gums healthy and reduce the risk of gum disease. At College Hill Dental, we are committed to helping our patients maintain good oral health throughout their lives. Contact us today to schedule an appointment and learn more about how we can help you maintain healthy gums as you age.

Must-Knows About Gum Disease

must-knows about gum disease - Easton PA dentist

Must-Knows About Gum Disease

Gum disease is a very common dental problem in the United States. This infection affects the tooth and its gums. You may also know gum disease as gingivitis or periodontitis. In this article, Dr. Dave, a dentist in Easton, PA, discusses some must-knows about gum disease. 

Gingivitis vs. Periodontitis

So, is there a difference between gingivitis and periodontitis? For starters, gingivitis develops prior to periodontitis. It normally refers to gum inflammation, whereas periodontitis is gum disease with tissue, bone, or both death.

Gingivitis occurs when bacterial plaque accumulates on the tooth’s surface, causing the gums to turn red and inflamed. One of the first signs of gingivitis is bleeding after brushing. The gums are inflamed and irritated, but the teeth are not yet loose. There is no permanent damage to the bone or underlying tissue at this stage of gum disease. Gingivitis is likely to progress to periodontitis if left untreated, says Dr. Dave Moghadam. 

Periodontitis occurs when the gums and bone pull away from the teeth, resulting in large pockets. Debris accumulates in the spaces between the gums and the teeth, infecting the area.

When plaque extends below the gum line into the pockets, the immune system kills bacteria. Because of the toxins released by the bacteria, the bone and connective tissue that hold the tooth begin to deteriorate. Teeth become brittle and can fall out. 

Symptoms

  • The teeth become longer as the gums recede. Gaps between the teeth are also possible.
  • gums that are inflamed or swollen, as well as recurring swelling in the gums bright red, often purple gums
  • pain when the gums are touched receding gums that cause the teeth to appear longer extra spaces appearing between the teeth
  • pus in the space between the teeth and the gums
  • Bleeding while brushing or flossing teeth, a metallic taste in the mouth, halitosis (bad breath), loose teeth
  • Since the teeth do not match as well as they used to, the individual can complain that their “bite” feels different.

Causes of Gum Disease

Gum disease is a direct result of poor oral hygiene. The built-up dental plaque deteriorates the enamel on your teeth. Once it hardens, it turns into tartar, also known as calculus. Our friend, Dr. Ryan Helgerson, a dentist in Grand Junction, CO, agrees that tartar is more difficult to remove than plaque and can only be removed by your dentist. Plaque can damage teeth and surrounding tissue gradually and slowly. If gingivitis is not treated, pockets between the teeth and gums may form. Bacteria accumulate in these pockets, causing serious dental problems

Bacterial toxins, in conjunction with the immune system’s response to infection, begin damaging the bone and connective tissue that keep teeth in place. The teeth will eventually become loose and can fall out. A fully interactive 3D model of periodontal disease is shown below. To learn more about periodontal disease, use your mouse pad or touchscreen to explore the model.

Risk Factors of Gum Disease

Gum disease is more likely to occur in people experiencing the following:

  • Smokers. Daily smokers are more likely to develop gum disease. Smoking also reduces the effectiveness of therapy. Smokers account for 90% of cases that do not respond to treatment.
  • Hormones. Hormonal changes arise during puberty, pregnancy, and menopause. These modifications increase the likelihood of contracting gum disease.
  • Diabetics. People with diabetes have a higher prevalence of gum disease than people of the same age.
  • Aids. Gum disease is more common in AIDS patients.
  • Cancer. and certain cancer therapies may increase the likelihood of gum disease.
  • Medication. Antihypertensive drugs or vasodilating agents (which relax and dilate blood vessels), immunotherapy drugs, and medicines that suppress saliva may also raise the risk of gum disease.
  • Genetics. Certain individuals are predisposed to gum disease due to inherited characteristics.

Diagnosing Gum Disease

Now that we’ve discussed the must-knows about gum disease, you have a better understanding of the severity of the problem. If you’re experiencing any of the above signs, contact your emergency dentist in Easton, PA. Gum disease and periodontitis can be detrimental to your oral health. Dr. Dave will be happy to examine your smile. Call College Hill Dental Group today to schedule a full-mouth evaluation.

Stages of Gum Disease

stages of gum disease - gum disease awareness month

Stages of Gum Disease

February is also Gum Disease Awareness Month! To celebrate, our Easton PA dentists are exploring the different stages of gum disease. If you believe you’re at any of these stages of gum disease, please contact our dental office immediately.

Gum Disease

There are three stages of gum disease. They range from moderate to extreme depending on the severity of the tooth infection. These three stages are considered to be gingivitis, periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. Read the following to learn more about gum disease and how it affects your oral health. 

Gingivitis 

You’ve probably heard of gingivitis, the first stage of gum disease. Most people experience gingivitis at one point in their lives. This stage of gum disease is a mild tooth infection. In contrast to the more serious stages of gum disease, gingivitis is the least damaging since it does not affect the bone. Dr. Moghadam says that immediate professional care can, in fact, reverse the infection, bringing you to a fast recovery. 

Many people don’t know they have gingivitis because the symptoms are subtle. The symptoms of gingivitis include sensitive, swollen, red, and bleeding gums. Other implications that you might have for gingivitis include the occasional bad breath, plaque buildup, and apparent gaps between gums and teeth. Dr. Ben Kacos, an endodontist in Shreveport, LA, points out that these holes are created as a result of disruption to the periodontal fibers known to connect the gums to the teeth.

Moderate Periodontitis 

Moderate periodontitis is the second stage of gum disease. This stage happens when gingivitis progresses due to a lack of treatment. Similar to gingivitis, your gums and teeth will be tender, red, sore, and bleeding. Dentists in Easton, PA, agree that bad breath is usually permanent at this stage.

For periodontitis, the condition is more advanced, which means the bone loss is now likely. This happens as a result of the development of periodontal pockets, which remove the teeth and establish a hub for infection. The infected gums cause the teeth to become brittle and loosen. However, there is still time to reverse the harm caused by moderate periodontitis. If you are at this stage of gum disease, please visit College Hill Dental Group for periodontal treatment in Easton, PA. 

Advanced Periodontitis 

Advanced periodontitis is the last and third-degree of gum disease. It is perhaps the most serious stage, causing tooth decay and tooth loss. Once you’ve reached this stage of gum disease, there is no going back. Unfortunately, advanced periodontitis is permanent. Signs of advanced periodontitis include swelling around the root of the tooth, a defective bite, and pus from the gums.

The magnitude of this stage means that periodontal pockets have now increased in size, deepening and providing more space for bacteria to flourish. As a result, this infection causes considerable damage to the bone and causes loss of teeth and decay. Your dentists may need to extract your teeth and restore them with dental implants or dentures. 

Visit College Hill Dental Group

If you’re at any stage of gum disease, please contact College Hill Dental Group immediately. Our team of experienced professionals will do everything possible to save your teeth and restore your smile to its original glory. We offer different dental savings plans to make our services affordable. If you have any questions at all, please give us a call. We look forward to seeing you soon!

February is also Gum Disease Awareness Month! To celebrate, our Easton PA dentists are exploring the different stages of gum disease. If you believe you’re at any of these stages of gum disease, please contact our dental office immediately.

Gum Disease

There are three stages of gum disease. They range from moderate to extreme depending on the severity of the tooth infection. These three stages are considered to be gingivitis, periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. Read the following to learn more about gum disease and how it affects your oral health. 

Gingivitis 

You’ve probably heard of gingivitis, the first stage of gum disease. Most people experience gingivitis at one point in their lives. This stage of gum disease is a mild tooth infection. In contrast to the more serious stages of gum disease, gingivitis is the least damaging since it does not affect the bone. Dr. Moghadam says that immediate professional care can, in fact, reverse the infection, bringing you to a fast recovery. 

Many people don’t know they have gingivitis because the symptoms are subtle. The symptoms of gingivitis include sensitive, swollen, red, and bleeding gums. Other implications that you might have for gingivitis include the occasional bad breath, plaque buildup, and apparent gaps between gums and teeth. Dr. Ben Kacos, an endodontist in Shreveport, LA, points out that these holes are created as a result of disruption to the periodontal fibers known to connect the gums to the teeth.

Moderate Periodontitis 

Moderate periodontitis is the second stage of gum disease. This stage happens when gingivitis progresses due to a lack of treatment. Similar to gingivitis, your gums and teeth will be tender, red, sore, and bleeding. Dentists in Easton, PA, agree that bad breath is usually permanent at this stage.

For periodontitis, the condition is more advanced, which means the bone loss is now likely. This happens as a result of the development of periodontal pockets, which remove the teeth and establish a hub for infection. The infected gums cause the teeth to become brittle and loosen. However, there is still time to reverse the harm caused by moderate periodontitis. If you are at this stage of gum disease, please visit College Hill Dental Group for periodontal treatment in Easton, PA. 

Advanced Periodontitis 

Advanced periodontitis is the last and third-degree of gum disease. It is perhaps the most serious stage, causing tooth decay and tooth loss. Once you’ve reached this stage of gum disease, there is no going back. Unfortunately, advanced periodontitis is permanent. Signs of advanced periodontitis include swelling around the root of the tooth, a defective bite, and pus from the gums.

So, the magnitude of this stage means that periodontal pockets have now increased in size, deepening and providing more space for bacteria to flourish. As a result, this infection causes considerable damage to the bone and causes loss of teeth and decay. Furthermore, your dentists may need to extract your teeth and restore them with dental implants or dentures. 

Visit College Hill Dental Group

If you’re at any stage of gum disease, please contact College Hill Dental Group immediately. Our team of experienced professionals will do everything possible to save your teeth and restore your smile to its original glory. We offer different dental savings plans to make our services affordable. If you have any questions at all, please give us a call. We look forward to seeing you soon!

How to Treat a Toothache

how to treat a toothache - emergency dentist near me

How to Treat a Toothache

February 9th, 2021, is National Toothache Day! Most of us have experienced a toothache at one point in our lives. If you have, you know how painful toothaches can be and that they don’t just go away on their own. In the following article, emergency dentists in Easton, PA, share different ways on how to treat a toothache.

What to Do If You Get a Toothache 

Any toothaches that come from pressure outside (but not inside) your tooth will get easier without going to the dentist. Pressure caused by redness in the gums will be healed within just a few days. Try not to chew about the infected area at this period. Eat soft foods, avoid hot or cold foods while your teeth are still sensitive.

How to Relieve Your Toothache at Home

Below are a few ways Dr. Moghahdam suggests temporarily relieving your toothache:

  • Rinsing with warm salt water is an old trick. Saltwater can release debris between your teeth, act as a disinfectant, and reduce inflammation. Stir a 1⁄2 teaspoon of salt in a bottle of warm water and clean your mouth thoroughly.
  • Rinse in peroxide and hydrogen. Hydrogen peroxide (3 percent solution) helps minimize inflammation and discomfort. Dilute the hydrogen peroxide with equivalent sections of the water and rinse thoroughly. Don’t swallow it.
  • Use a cold compress. Keep a cool compress of ice covered in a towel to the sore region for 20 minutes for swelling and discomfort. Repeat a couple of hours.
  • Use Anti-Inflammatory Medication. Over-the-counter pain medications can relieve pain and inflammation. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®). Do not give an infant under 16 years of age aspirin; instead, use Tylenol.
  • Try clove oil, say our friends at Park Boulevard Family Dentistry, a dental office in Pinellas, FL. A natural antiseptic that induces discomfort and decreases inflammation. Put a small amount of clove oil on a cotton ball and add to a sore area. Or apply a drop of clove oil to a bottle of water and clean your mouth thoroughly.
  • Extract of vanilla. Vanilla extract alcohol causes discomfort temporarily, and the antioxidants allow the area to recover. Using your fingers or cotton ball, and add the extract to your teeth and gum a few times a day.
  • Tee with peppermint. The relaxing effects of peppermint can be added to a sore region with a refrigerated peppermint tea bag. Keep this wet tea bag between your teeth and your gum.
  • It’s garlic. Prepare a paste of crushed garlic clove and add to the infected area. Garlic can destroy bacteria (containing antimicrobial allicin) and relieve pain.

Visiting Your Easton PA Dentist for a Toothache

Temporary, home-made pain relief will not be enough if the toothache continues. Contact our dental office in Easton, PA, if your toothache gets worse. 

Our dental staff will happily see you for an emergency dental visit. We will likely ask you the following questions:

  • Where’s the pain located?
  • When did it begin?
  • How bad is that?
  • What makes the suffering unbearable, and what gives you relief?

During your full mouth evaluation, we will check your lips, eyes, gums, jaws, tongue, lungs, sinuses, head, nose, and neck. We will also take dental X-rays to your teeth to better demonstrate the source of your toothache.

How Will the Dentist Treat My Toothache? 

Your treatment for your toothache will depend on the dental problem. After further assessment of your mouth, we will create a custom treatment plan and go over it with you:

  •  If you have a hole in your tooth, we will patch the cavity, perform a root canal, or, if necessary, extract your tooth. 
  • A root canal may be required if the source of the toothache is an inflammation of the nerve of the tooth. Bacteria, which have worked their way into the inner space of the root of the tooth, induce inflammation. This is the best solution if you have severe decay but are still able to save your tooth.
  • An antibiotic may be recommended if there is fever or swelling in the jaw. 

No matter what the cause of your toothache is, we’re more than happy to help treat it. Our modern dental office is well equipped to handle just about any dental emergency. Contact College Hill Dental Group today if you’re experiencing a dental emergency or would just like to schedule an appointment. 

How to Prevent Gum Disease

how to prevent gum disease - College Hill Dental Group

How to Prevent Gum Disease

Periodontal or gum disease refers to an infection of the tissues which hold your teeth in place. In most cases, gum disease results from poor oral hygiene (not brushing or flossing regularly). Over time, built-up plaque hardens into calculus on and around your teeth and gums. When periodontal disease advances, it can result in sore, bleeding gums, and pain while you chew. If the progression of the disease isn’t treated by your dentist in Easton, PA, tooth loss can eventually occur.

Causes of Gum Disease

You probably already know that your mouth is full of bacteria. This bacteria, in combination with other materials, such as food particles and mucus, constantly form a sticky substance called plaque. Plaque is colorless, and when left long enough, it hardens into tartar.

No amount of brushing or flossing can help remover tartar. You’ll need to see a professional in order to remove it. When visiting College Hill Dental Group for a dental cleaning, your dental hygienist will scrape away all the plaque and tartar that is built up. 

Dr. Cody Boals, a Colorado Springs dentist, adds that there are several risk factors that can play a part in developing gum disease. These include genetics, smoking, diabetes, hormonal changes in females, medications that cause dry mouth, and some illnesses, such as AIDS and their medications.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Periodontal (gum) disease triggers a number of symptoms, including the following:

  • Persistent bad breath
  • Swollen or red gums
  • Bleeding or tender gums
  • Pain when you chew
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Teeth appear longer due to gum recession

Diagnosis of Gum Disease

When you visit College Hill Dental Group, your hygienist or dentist in Easton, PA, will:

  • Check your gums for any signs of inflammation
  • Use a probe (a tiny ruler) to measure the gingival pockets (the gaps between your teeth and gums). In a healthy person, the gingival pockets are usually no wider than 3mm, so any pockets that exceed this size will be regarded as indicators of possible gum disease.
  • Inquire about your medical history. The intention here is to establish whether there are any risk factors or conditions that could pave the way for periodontal disease to develop.
  • Take x-rays to find out whether any bone loss has occurred.
  • Recommend periodontal therapy. These are specialists who diagnose and treat periodontal disease. The periodontist often has treatment methods that may not be available at your general dentist’s.

Treatment Options for Gum Disease

When gum disease is caught early, your dentist in Easton, PA, may recommend only a professional cleaning and give you instructions on how to manage the condition at home. However, when the disease progresses, some of the following options may become necessary when you visit College Hill Dental Group:

  • Root planing and scaling. This is a more invasive form of dental cleaning because it involves cleaning beneath your gum line. Don’t worry about the pain of this procedure; it will be performed under a local anesthetic.
  • Gum surgery may also be needed to repair the damage that has been caused by gum disease. For example, your Easton, PA dentist may recommend a gingivectomy. This is a surgical procedure during which infected gum tissue is removed. Flap surgery is another option when cleaning below the gum line is necessary. 
  • Regenerative procedures. You may also need to undergo oral surgery at College Hill Dental Group if one of our dentists finds that you have lost a lot of bone or soft tissues to gum disease. Bone grafting or a gum graft may be the specific procedure that you undergo to trigger the regeneration of bone or soft tissues.

How to Prevent Gum Disease

It is always better to prevent gum disease instead of waiting to have it treated by your dentist in Easton. The following preventive measures can help in this regard:

  • Brush your teeth two times every day using a fluoride toothpaste
  • Floss daily using flossing string, a water flosser, or any other device recommended by your dentist
  • Visit College Hill Dental Group regularly to have your teeth cleaned by a professional as well as to undergo dental checkups.
  • Stop smoking

Gum disease can affect anyone at any time. It is best to combine at-home preventive care with regular professional care provided by your Easton, PA dentist. If you suspect that you have gum disease, contact us immediately, and we will do everything possible to treat the condition before it progresses.